Walking in the Grampians National Park
McKenzie Falls © Nigel Cross
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<h1>Mckenzie Falls - Lookout Walk</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 1.9Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>18m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Mckenzie Falls Carpark</p><p>A short flat walk gives you spectacular views down over the Mackenzie Falls which is one of  largest waterfalls in Victoria. It's water comes from the elevated Lake Wartook which provides a regulated year round flow of water.</p><h2>Mckenzie Falls - Walk to Base</h2><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 2Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>118m</p><p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Mackenzie Falls Carpark</p><p>A well sign posted and steep walk down 270 steps to the base of the spectacular McKenzie Falls. No swimming is allowed at McKenzie Falls as it is dangerous and provides drinking water to local residents.</p> <h1>The Balconies</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 2Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>50m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Reeds Lookout Carpark</p><p>The Balconies is one of the iconic and most photographed features in the Grampians National Park. Reeds lookout itself provides stunning views across the Victoria Valley and has extensive mountain views looking to the West.</p><p>The path to the Balconies is made of gravel and has only a gentle gradient and is therefore suitable for use with a stroller and possibly for some wheel chairs. Towards the start of the walk there are views to the left of Lake Wartook. The short walk passes through stringybark forest; much of which is infected with cinnamon fungus. At the end of the walk the Balconies can be viewed from behind the railings.<p>In former times there was access to walk onto the lower lip of the 'Jaws of Death' but in these days of litigation and due to real danger that is not permitted now.</p><p>The Balconies are pictured in the photograph shown on the left. That is a sunset shot. It is best photographed just before sunset before the background mountains go into shadow. Another good place to take photographs is the from the Fire Tower which is set just a short but steep walk from and above Reeds Lookout. 
</p> <h1>Hollow Mountain</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 2.2Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>158m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Hollow Mountain Carpark</p><p>This walk is cool !  A steep rock scramble suitable for the more adventurous family. A reasonable head for heights and stout footware are required. Children need to be well supervised. Not suitable for carrying children in backpacks.</p><p>You literally need to use your hands as you clamber over some of these boulders. At the top of the rock scramble (where there is a long oblong shaped rock) the signage isn't very good. In front of that rock face there is a more chisled rock face and you need to go left on the near side of that. You walk along that rock face for 10m or so and then duck down and enter into the cavern through a low entrance. There is a climb inside the cavern to get views out over the plains and olive groves below.</p>
<h1>Silverband Falls</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 1.5Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>15m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Silverband Falls Carpark</p><p>The walk to Silverband Falls follows Diary Creek upstream from the Silverband Falls Carpark. This is an area which was ravaged by the extreme rainfall experienced in January 2011. En route you will see that the original bridge has been washed downstream.</p><p>You may need to take care crossing over the replacement stone crossing if the water level has risen. Otherwise the walk is an easy stroll through this much altered landscape where you will see trees which were washed downstream now piled up as if they were matchsticks.</P><p>The  waterfall itself is marginally deeper as many of the stones which formerly acted as a sump at the base of the falls were washed out now enabling a pool of water to form at the base of the falls again.</p><p>The waterfall usually flows year round but is more impressive after rain. This photograph has been taken a few days after moderate rain.</p>The walk undulates a little but is pretty easy for most people.</p>
</p> <h1>Beehive Falls</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 2.8Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>110m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Beehive Falls Carpark, Roses Gap Rd</p><p>This walk is best done in late  Winter or early Spring when the flowers in the Roses Gap area are in full bloom and the place looks idyllic.  When we walked to the Falls in mid August there was an amazing display of white Thryptomene and yellow Wattle everywhere and their scent filled the air. Along the way there were beautiful views of tall sandstone cliffs which glowed red towards sunset.</p><p>The walk to the Falls was gently undulating  until the section just before the Falls where there was a steep incline which would be harder for elderly people. For the average person though this would have to be classified as an easy walk.</p><p>Beehive Falls is a long drop waterfall which looks beautiful with various greenry growing on the impressive sandstone cliffs.</p> <h1>Chatauqua Peak & Clematis Falls</h1><p><strong>Distance:</strong> 5.6Km return</p><p><strong>Elevation change:</strong>200m</p>
<p><strong>Start Point:</strong> Halls Gap Recreation Oval Carpark</p><p>Chatauqua Peak offers impressive views of the facing sandstone cliffs and through Halls Gap and down to Lake Bellfield. You also see out through the gap in the Mountains and over parts of the Mount William Range to the Wimmera Plains beyond.</p><p>The start point is only 500m from the centre of Halls Gap. From the Recreation Centre you currently have to walk past the road closure signs on the Mount Victory Road and head towards the Grampians National Park Sign. The sign for the start of the walk to Chatauqua Peak and Clematis Falls which is enroute may be obscured behind a bush. Once on the trail it is easy to navigate your way.</p><p>The Clematis Falls is a short detour enroute and is best viewed after a heavy downpour as most of the time there is little water going over. From there the climb is a little steeper as the path zig zags up the the hill. Before reaching the Peak there are some boulders to clamber over. These are not too taxing but for some older people they might present a problem. The views make a satisfying climax to a pleasant walk.
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Mckenzie Falls - Lookout Walk

Distance: 1.9Km return

Elevation change:18m

Start Point: Mckenzie Falls Carpark

A short flat walk gives you spectacular views down over the Mackenzie Falls which is one of largest waterfalls in Victoria. It's water comes from the elevated Lake Wartook which provides a regulated year round flow of water.

Mckenzie Falls - Walk to Base

Distance: 2Km return

Elevation change:118m

Start Point: Mackenzie Falls Carpark

A well sign posted and steep walk down 270 steps to the base of the spectacular McKenzie Falls. No swimming is allowed at McKenzie Falls as it is dangerous and provides drinking water to local residents.